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Exploring African-American Ingenuity in Science & Technology: Part of An African Heritage

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A Guide to Selected Resources
Compiled by: Alicia Ann Randolph, MLIS

"Once the perspectives accepted until now by official science have been reversed, history of humanity will become clear and the history of Africa can be written."

CHEIKH ANTA DIOP

Introduction

Much is said and written about African-Americans shaping the popular culture of the United States with their endeavors in sports and entertainment. However, the same fervor of attention is not given to people of African descent participating in the world of science and innovation. There are a significant number of African-Americans making notable accomplishments as astronauts, chemists, inventors, information technology specialists, neurosurgeons, cancer specialists, electronic engineers and holistic practitioners centered in the African tradition of healing.

Over the past century, African and African-American scholars—Cheikh Anta Diop, Ivan Van Sertima, Charles S. Finch, Beatrice Lumpkin, Wini Warren, and Hattie Carwell, to name a few—continued to recover omitted, distorted, lost and suppressed histories about Africa's true gifts to humanity from past Black civilizations of Egypt, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mali and Ghana. The coalescence of this reclaimed information interestingly suggests a traceable lineage of African creativity and ingenuity that managed to survive and flourish despite the evil and violent institution of slavery. Today, communities worldwide continue to benefit from the ingenious heritage of African people.

Objective and Scope

A selection of resources in print, electronic and video formats were brought together in this guide for the purpose of assisting Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL) users in their search for materials documenting those original fruits in science, health, medicine and innovation contributed by Africans, their descendants in North America and throughout various parts of the African global community. Sources highlighted include essays and monographs, which often time exist hidden between the pages of magazines and journals or buried in chapters of books with seemingly unrelated titles. Although items cited can primarily be found in the Science, Technology and Patents Department of the Central Library, others have been identified from collections in the Social Sciences, Philosophy and Religion Department (located on lower-level three) and the History and Genealogy Department (located on lower level four).

Some resources for this webliography were identified by searching over four decades worth of entries from the Index to Black Periodicals (housed in the Social Sciences Department on lower-level three, (call# 326.973 O37) and conducting reviews of LAPL's online catalog. The remaining sources were actually "hand-picked" during painstaking, cursory manual examinations of sections within the Science department. This resource guide was divided into two parts: Part I, traces the legacy of African Science and Innovation; and Part II--explores both male and female African-American inventors and scientists. All sources were briefly annotated.

Part I: African Science and Innovation

Books: Focusing on African Science and Technology

bookjacketCarney, Judith A. Black Rice: the African Origins of Rice Cultivation in the Americas Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, 2001. A work tracing the agricultural significance of enslaved West Africans, who not only introduced rice to Americas, but also the technologies for its successful cultivation.633.18
C289
 Diop, Cheikh Anta. The African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality Chicago, IL: Lawrence Hill, 1974. A critical thesis exploring the origins of Egyptian Technology and its influence on Western Civilization. (Located in the History Department on lower-level four)932
D593
LL4
 Finch, Charles S. Imhotep the Physician: Archetype of the Great Man. Great Black Leaders: Ancient and Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1988. pp 213-231. An in-depth look at the life and work of an ancient Egyptian healer. (A Reference item located in the History Department on lower-level four)Ref
920
G7865-1
LL4
 Harris, M.A. The Black Book. New York: Random House, 1974. A historical scrapbook presenting African technology to the U.S. in pages 97-125. (Patent illustrations included). (Located in the Social Science Department on lower level three)301.45096
H315
LL3
 James, Peter. Ancient Inventions. New York: Ballantine Books, 1994. A worldwide study including those ancient African inventions that are still in use today.609
J28
 Mc Neil, Ian. An Encyclopaedia of the History of Technology. London: Routledge, 1990. An encyclopedia covering the technological developments of Central, South, East and North Africa.609
E565
 Okpaku, Joseph. Arts and Civilization of Black and African Peoples. Lagos: Centre of Black and African Arts and Civilization, 1986. Volume eight in this series highlights the science and technology of Africa's Black civilizations. (A Reference item located in the History Department on lower-level four)Ref
960
A7925
LL4
 Singer, Charles. History of Technology: From Early Times to Fall of Ancient Empires. Amen House, London: Oxford University Press, 1954. Vol. 1. A comprehensive study exclusively outlining the African technological and scientific contributions of Egypt.609
S617
 Spirit of Enterprise: The 1990 Rolex Awards. Switzerland: Buri Intl., 1990. An update profiling inventors and scientists from Africa and the African World Community. (See also 1993 edition under the same title and call number).608
S7595
bookjacketVan Sertima, Ivan. Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1983. A compilation of journal articles from Journal of African Civilizations discussing Africa's past and present innovations made in technology and science.509.6
B6315
2001
 Van Sertima, Ivan. Egypt Revisited. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1989. A collection of scholarly articles examining Egyptian influence on the exact sciences, medicine and technology. (Located in the History Department on lower-level four)932
E325-1
1989
LL4

Periodicals and Essays: Focusing on African Science & Technology

 Carney, Judith. Landscapes of Technology Transfer: Rice Cultivation and African Continuities. In Technology and Culture. (January, 1996) pp.5-35. An article tracing the application of African agricultural technology in the antebellum South. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketFinch, Charles S. The African Background of Medical Science. In Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1983. pp. 140-156. An essay highlighting Africa's contributions to ancient and conventional medicine. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.6
B6315
bookjacketHunter, Havelin Adams III. African Observers of the Universe: The Sirius Question. In Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1983 pp. 27-46. A discussion presenting the astronomical developments of the Dogon in Mali, Africa. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.6
B6315
bookjacketLumpkin, Beatrice. The Pyramids: Ancient Showcase of African Science & Technology. In Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1983, pp. 67-83. An essay examining the multiple scientific disciplines needed to construct ancient African monuments. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.6
B6315
bookjacketMazrui, Ali A. Technology Transfer in the Computer Age: the African Experience. In Technology, Development, and Democracy: International Conflict and Cooperation in the Information Age. Albany, New York : State University of New York Press, 2002. pp. 213-235. an analytical essay examining the current role modern technology has within African countries. (Located in the Social Science Department on lower-level three)301.55
T2555-1
LL3
bookjacketNewsome, Frederick. Black Contributors to the Early History of Western Medicine. In Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1983 pp. 127-139. A biographical presentation of those African scientist whose principles are still applied today. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.6
B6315
bookjacketPappademos, John. An Outline of Africa's Role in the History of Physics. In Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1983, pp. 177-196. An article outlining African contributions within the scientific study of physics. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.6
B6315
bookjacketShore, Debra. Steel-Making in Ancient Africa. In Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1983, pp. 157-162. A study discussing the development of metallurgy in Central Africa during antiquity. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.6
B6315
bookjacketWendorf, Fred. An Ancient Harvest on the Nile. In Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books. 1983, pp. 58-64. An essay on the agricultural technologies employed by Africans along the Nile Valley. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.6
B6315
bookjacketZaslavsky, Claudia. The Yoruba Number System. In Blacks and Science: Ancient And Modern. New Jersey: Transaction Books, 1983, pp. 110, 125. An analytical look at the Yoruba's use of their scientific numerical system. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.6
B6315

Part II: African-American Inventors, Scientists, and Healers

Books, Audiocassettes, Databases and Videos: Focusing on African-American Male Innovators, and Healers in the African Tradition

bookjacketAllen, Will W. Banneker: The Afro-American Astronomer. Salem, MA: Ayer Co., 1992. A scholarly work bringing together Banneker's lifelong accomplishments as a mathematician, astronomer, writer, and orator. (A Room Reference item)Ref
520.92
B219Alle
1992
bookjacketBaker, Henry F. The Colored Inventor. New Hampshire: Ayer Co., Pubs., Inc., 1992. One of the first African-American patent examiners reviews the inventive contributions made by Black inventors on the 50th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.609.73
B167
bookjacketBarber, John T. The Information Society and the Black Community. Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 2001. A comprehensive work detailing the use and application of today's technologies within the African-American community. (Located in the Social Science Department on lower-level three)301.45096
I435
LL3
bookjacketBreakthrough: the Changing Face of Science in America. Boston, MA: WGBH, 1996. A six part video series examining advances made by 20 people of color (including African-Americans) in biology, astronomy, and physics.VID
509
B8285
bookjacketBrodie, James. Created Equal: The Lives and Ideas of Black American Innovators. Brodie profiles more than 60 African-American inventors existing during slavery, twentieth century, and well into the modern era. (Located in the Social Science Department on lower-level three)301.45096
B864
LL3
bookjacketBurt, Jr., McKinley. Black Inventors of America. Portland, Oregon: National Book Co., 1989. A book which presents the registered inventions of over 7 African-American inventors. (A Room Reference item)Ref
609.73
B973
bookjacketByrd, W. Michael. An American Health Dilemma: A Medical History of African-Americans and the Problem of Race. New York: Routledge, 2000. In two volumes, the author examines the history race has had on the health care of African-Americans in the United States since slavery to the year 2000.614.0973
B995
bookjacketCerami, Charles A. Benjamin Banneker: Surveyor, Astronomer, Publisher, Patriot. New York: J. Wiley, 2002. A biographical work re-examining the role of Benjamin Banneker as astronomer, surveyor, publisher, and American patriot. There are bibliographical references on pp. 243-245.520.92
B219Ce
bookjacketDetroit Public Library. African-American Inventors Database. Detroit: Detroit Public Library, 2000. A printed version of a database listing Black inventors registered with the United States Patent and Trademark Office as far back as 1891 to 2003.Ref
609.73
A2585
bookjacketFinkelman, Paul. Medicine, Nutrition, Demography, and Slavery. New York: Garland Publishing, 1989. A historical account of health and hygiene for Africans enslaved in the United States. (A Room Reference item)Ref
613.0973
M48955
 Foy, David M. Great Discoveries and Inventions by African-Americans. 2nd ed. Edgewood, MD: APU Pub. Group, 1998. Aside from profiling familiar Black inventors, Foy features several obscure individuals including Andrew J. Beard, Clay S. Gloster and Frederick McKinley Jones.

609.73 F796
1998

bookjacketHaskins, James. Outward Dreams: Black Inventors and Their Inventions. N.Y.: Bantam Books, 1992. A biographical presentation of over 9 African American Inventors: patentee appendix available.609
H351
1992
bookjacketHayden, Robert C. Nine Black American Doctors. Reading, MA : Addison-Wesley, 1996. Highlights the lives and medical careers of nine African-American doctors.610.973
H415
bookjacketIves, Patricia Carter. Creativity and Inventions: The Genius of Afro-Americans and Women in the United States. Arlington, Virginia: Research Unlimited, 1987. An exposition of Black male & female inventors, lists of patent titles, registration numbers and classifications.609.73
I95
bookjacketIves, Patricia Carter. The Real McCoy: African-American Invention and Innovation, 1619-1930. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1989. This exhibit catalog is a historical tribute examining over 300 years of African-American ingenuity.608
J28
1989
bookjacketJeffrey, Laura S. Collective Bibliographies: African-American Inventors of the 20th Century. New Jersey: Enslow Publishing, 1996. This source contains the biographies of Black inventors Lonnie Johnson and Robert F. Shurney.609.73
J46
bookjacketJenkins, Edward. American Black Scientists and Inventors. Washington, D.C.: National Science Teachers Asso., 1975. A booklet presenting 12 biographical sketches of Black male inventors.509
A512
1975
bookjacketJenkins, Edward. To Fathom More: African-American Scientists and Inventors. Lantham, Md.: University Press of America, 1966. The author presents the historical accounts of 17 scientists (14 men and 3 women) of African descent. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.73
J52
bookjacketKessler, James H. Distinguished African-American Scientists of the 20th Century. Phoenix, AZ: Oryx Press, 1996. This item contains 100 biographical sketches of African-Americans in science and medicine (87 of the people featured are still alive). (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.73
P6625
bookjacketKlein, Aaron. Hidden Contributors: Black Scientists and Inventors in America. New York: Doubleday, 1971. A book containing points of interest about Black American achieved innovations. (A Room Reference item)Ref
608
K64
bookjacketPearson, Willie. Black Scientists, White Society, and Colorless Science. N.Y.: Associated Faculty Press, 1985. A survey attesting to the status of Blacks in the social, physical and life sciences.509.73
P362
bookjacketPioneer Black Doctors: A Century of Contributions to Medical Science. North Hollywood, CA: Center for Cassette studies, 1974. A sound recording detailing the significance made by African-American doctors to the medical profession in the 20th century.AUD
610.973
P6625-1
bookjacketRennert, Richard. Pioneers of Discovery. NY: Chelsea House, 1994. A work profiling the accomplishments of 8 renowned African-American pioneers in science including Guion Bluford, Lewis Latimer, and Matthew Henson.509.73
P6625
bookjacketRice, Mitchell F. Black American Health: An Annotated Bibliography. New York: Greenwood Press, 1987. A list of articles and essays related to health and medical care of African-Americans in the United States. (A Room Reference item)Ref
613.097302
R497
bookjacketSavitt, Todd Lee. Medicine and Slavery: The Diseases and Health Care of Blacks in Antebellum Virginia. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois press, 1978. A study examining health care practices against disease and injury experienced by African slaves in antebellum Virginia.610.9755
S267
bookjacketTravers, Bridget. World of Invention. Detroit, MI: Gale Research, 1994. An encyclopedia profiling contributions of inventive Americans including Black innovators.608.03
W9275
bookjacketWalker, Marcellus A. Natural Health for African-Americans: The Physicians' Guide. NY: Warner Books, 1999. Doctor Marcellus Walker and Kenneth Singleton compiled this 3-part guide to address holistic and alternative health needs specifically for people of African descent.613
W182
bookjacketWebster, Raymond B. African-American Firsts in Science and Technology. Detroit, MI: Gale Group, 1999. A catalog of pioneering African-Americans in science and technology disciplines including agriculture, health, dentistry, mathematics, engineering, and more. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.73
W383
bookjacketWharton, David E. A Struggle Worthy of Note: The Engineering and Technological Education of Black Americans. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1992. In this work, Wharton traces the 135 year-old history of African-Americans in the fields of technology and engineering. (A Reference item located in the Social Science Department on lower-level three)Ref
378.9962
W553

Periodicals: Focusing on African-American Male Innovators and Scientists

bookjacketBlack Enterprise, Editorial Staff. Black Inventors: Past and Present. In Black Enterprise (July 1975). pp. 32, 34, 36. An article tracing the experiences of African-American inventors who sought to benefit from their ideas. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketChristopher, Michael C. Granville T. Woods: The Plight of a Black Inventor. In Journal of Black Studies, 1981. 11(3): pp. 269-276. A biographical essay covering Woods' 50 patented electrical and railroad inventions and the impact racism had on the marketing of his products. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketEbony. Black Inventors: Little Known Creators That Have Revolutionized American Industry. In Ebony, 1990. 45(4): pp. 128-134. An article focusing on inventions by Black Americans that changed industrial North America. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketGibbs, C.R. A New First. In American Visions. (August 1987): pp. 8, 11, 12. A review of African-Americans involved in the patent registration process. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketJenkins, E. S. Impact of Social Conditions: A Study of the Work of American Black Scientists and Inventors. In Journal of Black Studies, 1984, 14(4): pp. 447- 491. An examination into how racism limited the contributions of Black inventors & scientists. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketJenkins, E. S. Bridging the Two Cultures: American Black Scientists and Inventors. In Journal of Black Studies, 1991. 21(3): pp. 313-324. An essay exploring past and current attempts to bridge the gap between these two disciplines. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketKing, Anita. Family Tree. In Essence. (February 1976), p. 17. A historical look at a number of well known African-American inventors and scientists. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketMalcom, Shirley M. Reclaiming Our Past. In Journal of Negro Education, 1990. 59(3) pp. 246-259. An article urging the recognition of past innovative facts by African American inventors. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketScarupa, Harriet J. Digging for the Facts About Benjamin Banneker. In American Visions. (August 1987). pp. 16-21. An article revealing new facts about this Black scientist which were found buried on his estate. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketSulby, Patricia Carter. Minority Inventive Genius: A Look at Spirited American People. In Journal of the Afro-American Historical & Genealogical Society, 1990. 11(12): pp. 50-63. A profile examining the little known talents of 16 well known African American inventors. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 

Books and Videos: Focusing on African-American Female Innovators, Scientists, and Healers in the African Tradition

bookjacketAbir-Am, Pnina. Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science. N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1987. A compilation profiling African-American women in science.500
U475
bookjacketBankole, Katherine K. Slavery and Medicine: Enslavement and Medical Practices in Antebellum Louisiana. NY: Garland Publishing, 1998. An in-depth study evaluating medical care among African slaves of antebellum Louisiana and their efforts to manage the effects of illness and injury. (A Reference item retrieved from the Science Desk)Ref
610.9763
B218
bookjacketBreakthrough Profiles of Scientists of Color. MA: Blackside Inc., 1996. A video profiling the careers of three scientists including a nine minute segment on African-American computer scientist, Valerie Taylor.VID
509
B8285-1
bookjacketCarwell, Hattie. Blacks in Science: Astrophysicist to Zoologist. Hicksville, NY: Exposition Press, 1977. An "a" to "z" directory containing narrative essays about Blacks in science between the range of astrophysics and zoology, including chemists and laser physicists. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.73
C331
 Frankel, Barbara. Childbirth in the Ghetto: Folk Beliefs of Negro Women in a North Philadelphia Hospital Ward. San Francisco: R & E Research Associates, 1977. This work, based on the author's doctoral thesis, presents a collection of African folkloric birth customs and traditional medicine practices by African-American women in a North Philadelphia hospital ward. (A Reference item located in the Literature Department on upper level three.)Ref
813.1
F829
UL3
bookjacketHaber, Louis. Women Pioneers of Science. N.Y.: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1979. Although this book highlights women of all nationalities, an extensive profile is devoted to Dr. Myra Adele Logan (pp. 97-104), the first Black American female surgeon to perform open heart surgery.509
H1135
bookjacketHerzenberg, C.L. Women Scientists From Antiquity to the Present. N.Y.: Locust, 1986. A biographical directory including Black women scientists in ancient and modern times.509
H582
bookjacketIves, Patricia Carter. Creativity and Inventions: The Genius of Afro-Americans and Women in the United States VI. Arlington, VA.: Research Unlimited, 1987. This work features African-American male inventors and contains an index identifying patent titles, registration numbers and classified subject headings.609.73
I95
bookjacketKimbrough, Marjorie L. Accept No Limitations: A Black Woman Encounters Corporate America. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1991. The personal journey of Marjorie L. Kimbrough, a mathematical engineer, who worked for Lockheed Aircraft Corporation during 1963-1966. (Located in the Business & Economics Department on lower-level one)331.4
K495
LL1
bookjacketKrapp, Kristine. Notable Black American Scientists. Detroit, MI: Gale Research, 1999. This source presents the contributions made by 254 African-American physicians and scientists, 59 of whom are women. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.73
N8995
bookjacketLong, Carolyn M. Spiritual Merchants: Religion, Magic, and Commerce. Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee Press, 2001. A two-part study detailing Afri-Caribbean religious traditions and its cultural materials which include botanicals, beads, and aromatics. (Located in the Social Science Department on lower-level three)133.09
L849
LL3
bookjacketMacDonald, Anne. Feminine Ingenuity: How Women Inventors Changed America. N.Y.: Ballantine Books, 1992. Contains brief profiles of women whose inventions have affected American society, industry, and economics, including Ellen F. Eglin, Henrietta Bradbury, and Madame C.J. Walker.609.73
M135
bookjacketMoussa, Farag. Women Inventors Honored by World Intellectual Property Organization. Geneva: (WIPO), 1991. A compiled report on female honorees by WIPO for their innovative projects including women from Africa and different parts of the African World Community.609
M933
bookjacketReese, Sara L. Staying Strong: Reclaiming the Wisdom of African-American Healing. NY: Whole Care, 1999. Edited by the staff that publishes the HealthQuest Quarterly, traditional African healing practices are introduced and practitioner referral information provided.615.5
S7985
bookjacketSammons, Vivian O. Blacks in Science and Medicine. N.Y.: Hemisphere Pub., 1990. A publication listing the educational background, major specialties and accomplishments of 65 Ph.D.ed Black women in science related disciplines: 198 surgeons, 82 physicians, 32 psychiatrists and 2 pathologists.509
B6315
bookjacketSnow, Loudell F. Walkin' Over Medicine. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1993. A resource written by an anthropologist concerned with preserving the African-American traditional healing practices in lower income communities.614.0973
S674
bookjacketSteiner, Paul E. Medical History of a Civil War Regiment: Disease in the Sixty-Fifth United States Colored Infantry. Institute of Civil War Studies, 1977. A historical account of the diseases suffered by African-American soldiers and their system of medical care during 1861-1865.(A Reference item located in the History Department on lower-level four)Ref
973.775
S822-1
LL4
bookjacketSullivan, Andrea. A Path to Healing: A Guide to Wellness for Body, Mind, and Soul. NY: Doubleday, 1998. A physician in naturopathic medicine, Sullivan combines the use of nutrition, herbs, homeopathy, hydrotherapy, exercise, massage and acupuncture to "heal people, not diseases."615.535
S949
bookjacketU.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Public Affairs. Black Contributors to Science and Energy Technology. Washington, D.C.: Dept. Of Energy, Office of Public Affairs, 1979. Profiles 12 African-American scientist and inventors -- past and present, male and female. (A Room Reference item)Ref
608
B6275-1
bookjacketVare, Ethlie Ann. Women Inventors & Their Discoveries. Minneapolis: Oliver Press, 1993. This book does provide an extensive look at the life and inventions of Madam C. J. Walker.609.73
V292
bookjacketWarren, Wini. Black Women Scientists in the United States. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1999. One of the most comprehensive resources guiding users to over 100 narrative sketches on African-American female scientists and physicians.509.73
W294
bookjacketYoung, Herman A. Scientist in the Black Perspective. Kentucky: Lincoln Found, 1974. Critique of the science profession by both African-American female and male scientists. (A Room Reference item)Ref
509.73
Y72

Periodicals: African-American Female Innovators and Scientists
(The Sage magazine is kept in a pamphlet file located at the Science Reference Desk. It is filed as Inventors-African-American)

bookjacketCobb, Jewel Plummer. A Life in Science: Research and Service. In Sage, 1989 6(2): pp. 39-43. An auto-biographical essay presenting the life work of African-American, female scientist, Jewel P. Cobb. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketFalconer, Etta. A Story of Success: The Sciences at the Science Department of Spelman College. In Sage, 1989. 6(2): pp. 36-39. A status review about African-American female recruitment efforts by the Science Department at Spelman College. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketGranville, Evelyn Boyd. My Life as a Mathematician. In Sage, 1989. 6(2): pp. 44-46. An auto-biographical article by an African-American female mathematician. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketJenkins, Edward S. Impact of Social Conditions: A Study of the Work Of American Black Scientists and Inventors. In Journal of Black Studies, 1984 14(4): pp. 477-491. A study examining how societal obstacles affect the work of our country's leading Black scientists and inventors. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) (A Room Reference item) 
bookjacketKing, Reatha. Becoming a Scientist: An Important Career Decision. In Sage, 1989. 6(2): pp. 47-50. An essay by a Black female scientist critically assessing her life and professional career. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketMalcom, Shirley. Increasing the Participation of Black Women in Science and Technology. In Sage, 1989. 6(2): pp. 15-17. A study analyzing pro-active methods to recruit Black women into science and technology professions. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketPatrick, Jennie R. Trials, Tribulations, Triumphs. In Sage, 1989. 6(2): pp. 33, 35. Jennie R. Patrick discusses her challenges and successes as the first African-American female to obtain a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketSulby, Patricia Carter. Blacks, Women, and Inventions. In Sage, 1989. 6(2): pp, 33-35. An article concentrating on the inventiveness of 7 African-American women who own registered patents. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketSulby, Patricia Carter. Minority Inventive Genius: A Look at Spirited American People. In Journal of the Afro-American Historical and Genealogical Society, 1990. 11 (2): pp. 50-63. A compilation of interviews with insight on the innovative drives of African-American inventors. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk) 
bookjacketThomas, Valerie I. Black Women Engineers and Technologists. In Sage, 1989. 6(2): pp. 24-32. A study tracing the participation of African-American women in the fields of technology and engineering. (Periodical retrieval requests are accepted at the Science Reference Desk)

 

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