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Central's Giant Video Wall is a Venue for Film, Digital Art, and Animation

Neale Stokes, Librarian III, Digital Content Team,
Image of Central Library Video Wall

Los Angeles Central Library is the crown jewel of our library system, a temple to knowledge visited by 5,000 people a day. Part of what makes Central distinct is the integration of art and iconography into its architecture—from the murals in the Rotunda to the inscriptions and sculptures which adorn the building’s facade.

The 30 foot-wide Central Library Video Wall is a new addition to the building, but it continues Central Library’s architectural legacy of using the built environment for communication and storytelling. The wall is intended to be a space for serendipitous discovery, and to serve as a venue for innovative digital art, films, and animation.

Since its construction in 2017, the Video Wall has featured a blend of original and curated content, and beginning this year, the library has partnered with StandardVision to expand its Video Wall programming. Creative Producer Sinziana Velicescu has curated a selection of short films which will run daily on the video wall for the next several months during the library's open hours, with new works added throughout the year. Read on to learn more about the current selections and their creators:

still from Schwarm by Andreas Fischer

Andreas Fischer is a multimedia visual artist working with software, sculpture and installation.

Schwarm is a processing application that uses a swarm of particles to gradually create an abstract composition from photographs.

still from Massive by Dan Chen

Dan Chen is an award winning filmmaker based in Los Angeles.

His film Massive explores our presence on Earth in a way that’s both playful and majestic while also depicting a story of humanity’s growth. It is also a celebration of the diverse characters and landscapes of Los Angeles.

Still from Radiances by Sabrina Ratté

Sabrina Ratté lives and works between Montreal and Paris. After a BFA and MFA in Film Production at Concordia University in Montreal, she focused mainly on video as a medium.

Radiances is a series of paintings in motion. Through a combination of animated 3D, video synthesis and digital manipulations, painterly textures and organic forms emerge to create animated landscapes leaning towards abstraction.

Still from Space Plant by Pascual Sisto

Pascual Sisto uses his videos, sculptures, and installations to explore forms of representation through the use of mathematical structures, patterns, and digital interventions.

In Aucuba Expanded, the golden dust pattern of a household plant becomes the motif for an immersive video art experience.

Still from A Conversation with Angels by Christy Lee Rogers

Christy Lee Rogers is a visual artist from Kailua, Hawaii.

A Conversation With Angels is an underwater installation film created by Artist Christy Lee Rogers. Using water to pose questions about our existence and the fragile nature of mankind, the artist takes us into a dreamscape of aquatic expressions of movement set against light and dark contrasts of nighttime pools of water.

Tom Carroll is a journalist and filmmaker known for his web series on the history of Los Angeles and surrounding areas. He tells the stories of L.A. one landmark at a time, guiding us through the evolution of our city and the distinct features and background that makes it truly unique.

41 Payphones in Los Angeles is part of a series titled Visible Statements, partly inspired by works by Ed Ruscha and William Eggleston. This is documentation of Los Angeles under an arbitrary constraint—shadows, colors, people, etc. Visible Statements seeks to engage with the city in a basic way—on foot, with eyes and ears open.


The Central Library Video Wall is located in the Tom Bradley wing of Central Library and is viewable any time the library is open. The above works will be on display through early spring 2019.

 

 

 

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