And Now for Something Completely Different: The Latino Baseball History Project | Los Angeles Public Library
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And Now for Something Completely Different: The Latino Baseball History Project

Sheryn Morris, Librarian, Central Library,
Group portrait of the Aztecas, a girl's baseball team based in Pacoima, with their manager. Della Fonseca (later Ortega) is standing, second from right,
Group portrait of the Aztecas, a girl's baseball team based in Pacoima, with their manager. Della Fonseca (later Ortega) is standing, second from right, [1936]. Shades of L.A. Collection: Mexican American Community

Baseball is considered to be an all-American sport, but not all Americans have been able to fully participate. The history of Mexican American baseball bears witness to that. It demonstrates the lives of the people, the communities, and the part that baseball played in changing and evolving ideas about who can participate in all aspects of this sport.

We are celebrating Latino Heritage Month through October 15. Our Central Library will be having a day-long Latino Heritage celebration with programs and activities for all ages. One of the featured programs on Saturday, September 22, will be a presentation by Richard Santillan, author, and historian from the Latino Baseball History Project. Professor Santillan and some of the veteran baseball players (85 to 95-year-olds), will be on hand to talk about the history of the project, and the personal experiences of these former athletes. The program runs from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. in our Taper Auditorium.

Mexican-American baseball flourished in Southern California from the early 1900s to the 1970s. It was a popular sport, but it was also something more. Baseball leagues helped create a cohesive and vibrant community and they were a source of pride. The games became a place for meetings across the region and were integral to discussion and eventually to political organization within the communities. We are dedicated to preserving the memories and history for future generations. —From the Latino Baseball History Project

Latino Baseball History Project Books



 

 

 

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