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    Cemetery John : the undiscovered mastermind of the Lindbergh kidnapping

    by Zorn, Robert E.

    Reviewed by: Robyn Myers, Management Analyst, Branch Library Services

    October 29, 2012

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    Call Number: 364.92 H374Zo

    In 1932, Charles A. Lindbergh was arguably the most famous man in the world. His solo transatlantic flight in 1927 made him the subject of public fascination and adulation. But fame was not something that Lindbergh craved. He took his family to live on a rambling, isolated estate in Englewood, New Jersey, believing that living in such a remote location would keep them safe. He was wrong.

    On the night of March 1, 1932, Charles A. Lindbergh Jr., called Charlie, was snatched from his crib in the upstairs nursery. Left behind were a ransom note and a handmade ladder. Contact with the... Read Full Review

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    The map of the sky : a novel

    by Palma, Felix J.

    Reviewed by: Daryl M., Librarian, Central Library

    October 8, 2012

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    Call Number: F

    What if an author wrote and published a novel dealing with an extraordinary occurrence, and within a year the described event happened? Would the author have special insight into what had happened? Would the novel’s publication and the event be seen as coincidence? Or, would s/he be seen as being somehow complicit in bringing these circumstances to life? And what if the fate of Earth rested on the answers to these questions? These are just some of the intriguing ideas explored in Felix J. Palma’s The Map of the Sky.

    On August 1, 1898, a large, strange metallic... Read Full Review

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    Babylon : Mesopotamia and the birth of civilization

    by Kriwaczek, Paul.

    Reviewed by: Eileen Y., Librarian, InfoNow

    September 24, 2012

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    Call Number: 935.8 K92 2012

    For a sweeping, epic and vivid historical survey of ancient Mesopotamia, this book by Paul Kriwaczek is a great choice. Kriwaczek takes the reader through a deftly written overview of the various cultures, emperors and kings that swept through the Mesopotamian region over the course of centuries. Specifically, he covers the years 4000-700 BCE. This is not an academic or dry text, but rather a book that makes the daily lives of many people of that time come alive, not only in descriptions of the rulers and elite classes, but also in the descriptions of the average person. The author also... Read Full Review

  • The keeper of lost causes

    by Adler-Olsen, Jussi.

    Reviewed by: Sheryn Morris, Librarian, Central Library

    September 17, 2012

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    Call Number: F

    The thrills of the tightly wrought suspense/mystery novels from Scandinavia continue with the first English translation of The Keeper of Lost Causes by Denmark’s top crime writer, Jussi Adler-Olsen. This is the first book in the Department Q series whose main protagonist is Detective Carl Mørck, selected to run the new department which investigates and dogs down cold cases. It is an outstanding thriller, and more than a match for the works of Stieg Larsson.

    These are some of the events and themes that are tightly woven into the plot of this captivating book that cannot... Read Full Review

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    This dark endeavor : the apprenticeship of Victor Frankenstein

    by Oppel, Kenneth

    Reviewed by: Daryl M., Librarian, Central Library

    September 10, 2012

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    Call Number: YA

    If you found out that a close member of your immediate family was ill, and the doctors treating your family member seemed incapable of curing him, what would you do? Would you seek out other types of treatment--even illegal ones? Would you consult with a person convicted of practicing “dark arts,” or even attempt to practice them yourself? What would you choose to do to save a family member at risk of dying? These are some of the questions explored in Kenneth Oppel’s This Dark Endeavor: The Apprenticeship of Victor Frankenstein.

    Twins Konrad and Victor... Read Full Review

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    Mechanique : a tale of the Circus Tresaulti

    by Valentine, Genevieve

    Reviewed by: Daryl M., Librarian, Central Library

    September 3, 2012

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    Call Number: F

    Have you ever wanted something so badly that you would do anything to get it? Something that captivated you from the first moment you saw it--and you knew that this thing would either make you happier than you ever thought possible, or it would destroy you. Would you work and wait an unknown amount of time? Work and live with people you did not like, who did not like you either? Suffer? Die? What if you were the creator of something that affected the people around you like this? Would bestowing your creation be a blessing or a curse? And how would you choose the recipients? These are just... Read Full Review

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    The house in France : a memoir

    by Wells, Gully.

    Reviewed by: Sheryn Morris, Librarian, Central Library

    August 27, 2012

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    Call Number: 071.092 W453We

    In this sparkling, joyful family memoir, Gully Wells has created an homage to her mother, the irrepressible Dee Wells, not exactly a rock of stability, but who did create a vacation house that would become a solid lodestone in the lives of her children, grandchildren, husband, lovers and friends. She bought a ramshackle farmhouse that was clinging to a hillside in southern France and made it into a vacation home that became a summer retreat, and respite for some, from a busy life in England.

    Dee Wells was a femme fatale who at times unwittingly attracted men wherever she went.... Read Full Review

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    The Yard

    by Grecian, Alex

    Reviewed by: Mary McCoy, Senior Librarian, Teen'Scape

    August 20, 2012

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    Call Number: M

    Alex Grecian’s debut novel is set during the aftermath of the Jack the Ripper murders in a London that’s been forever changed by them. “Saucy Jack” has, as one character notes, “opened a door to certain deranged possibilities... there will be more like him.” And from the first page of The Yard, there are.

    In response to the public outcry at their failure to capture Jack the Ripper, London’s Metropolitan Police Force forms an elite Murder Squad of twelve detectives. After less than a week on the job, the Murder Squad’s newest member,... Read Full Review

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    The piper's son

    by Marchetta, Melina

    Reviewed by: Vi Ha, Young Adult Librarian, Teen'Scape

    August 13, 2012

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    Call Number: YA

    After a night of heavy partying, Tom hits rock bottom. Strung out on drugs and suffering from a concussion, Tom wakes up in the hospital to hear the news from Francesca, a former close friend, that his flatmates have lost their jobs for stealing from the Union pub and his stuff has been tossed out on the street.

    At this point, Tom’s life has already fallen apart — his favorite uncle died in a terrorist bomb attack on the subway in London, his father, broken from the news, has started drinking heavily, and his mother and his sister have left his father. Unable to cope, Tom... Read Full Review

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    Year zero : a novel

    by Reid, Robert

    Reviewed by: Daryl M., Librarian, Central Library

    August 6, 2012

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    Call Number: SF

    What if humans were unimaginably horrible at every form of art in the universe but one: music? And what if our music was so good, compared to the efforts of our galactic neighbors, that its discovery resulted in a type of galactic reckoning where dates were revised, cultures were altered and some races were completely wiped out due to ecstatic brain hemorrhaging? And what if the collective universe’s love of our music resulted in so much unintended piracy (according to our laws) that if an attempt were made to pay the fines, the universe, and everyone in it, would be bankrupted? This... Read Full Review

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    Dreaming in French : the Paris years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davi

    by Kaplan, Alice Yaeger

    Reviewed by: Sheryn Morris, Librarian, Central Library

    July 30, 2012

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    Call Number: 920.073 K165

    Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis were three American women who, in their youth, spent time studying and living in Paris. Based on extensive research in archives in the United States and France, Alice Kaplan examines the lasting effects of the women's experiences which formed a lifelong French connection for all three. Living in France would sustain, nourish, and confirm a sense of independence and uniqueness in each of their lives. All three were outsiders within their social milieus in the United States.

    As a Catholic with divorced parents in the 1950s,... Read Full Review

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    Redshirts

    by Scalzi, John

    Reviewed by: Daryl M., Librarian, Central Library

    July 23, 2012

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    Call Number: SF

    What if your coworkers were regularly being killed off, and in spectacularly implausible ways, while your superiors were always left unfazed and untouched? Wouldn’t you try to figure out why and make sure whatever was happening to them didn’t happen to you? This is the premise John Scalzi boldly explores in Redshirts.

    Ensign Andrew Dahl has just been assigned to the Intrepid, the flagship of the Universal Union. But once he reports for his new posting, he can’t help but notice that things on the Intrepid are far from normal. His crewmates in the Xenobiology lab... Read Full Review

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