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    The house in France : a memoir

    by Wells, Gully.

    Reviewed by: Sheryn Morris, Librarian, Central Library

    August 27, 2012

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    Call Number: 071.092 W453We

    In this sparkling, joyful family memoir, Gully Wells has created an homage to her mother, the irrepressible Dee Wells, not exactly a rock of stability, but who did create a vacation house that would become a solid lodestone in the lives of her children, grandchildren, husband, lovers and friends. She bought a ramshackle farmhouse that was clinging to a hillside in southern France and made it into a vacation home that became a summer retreat, and respite for some, from a busy life in England.

    Dee Wells was a femme fatale who at times unwittingly attracted men wherever she went.... Read Full Review

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    The Yard

    by Grecian, Alex

    Reviewed by: Mary McCoy, Senior Librarian, Teen'Scape

    August 20, 2012

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    Call Number: M

    Alex Grecian’s debut novel is set during the aftermath of the Jack the Ripper murders in a London that’s been forever changed by them. “Saucy Jack” has, as one character notes, “opened a door to certain deranged possibilities... there will be more like him.” And from the first page of The Yard, there are.

    In response to the public outcry at their failure to capture Jack the Ripper, London’s Metropolitan Police Force forms an elite Murder Squad of twelve detectives. After less than a week on the job, the Murder Squad’s newest member,... Read Full Review

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    The piper's son

    by Marchetta, Melina

    Reviewed by: Vi Ha, Young Adult Librarian, Teen'Scape

    August 13, 2012

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    Call Number: YA

    After a night of heavy partying, Tom hits rock bottom. Strung out on drugs and suffering from a concussion, Tom wakes up in the hospital to hear the news from Francesca, a former close friend, that his flatmates have lost their jobs for stealing from the Union pub and his stuff has been tossed out on the street.

    At this point, Tom’s life has already fallen apart — his favorite uncle died in a terrorist bomb attack on the subway in London, his father, broken from the news, has started drinking heavily, and his mother and his sister have left his father. Unable to cope, Tom... Read Full Review

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    Year zero : a novel

    by Reid, Robert

    Reviewed by: Daryl M., Librarian, Central Library

    August 6, 2012

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    Call Number: SF

    What if humans were unimaginably horrible at every form of art in the universe but one: music? And what if our music was so good, compared to the efforts of our galactic neighbors, that its discovery resulted in a type of galactic reckoning where dates were revised, cultures were altered and some races were completely wiped out due to ecstatic brain hemorrhaging? And what if the collective universe’s love of our music resulted in so much unintended piracy (according to our laws) that if an attempt were made to pay the fines, the universe, and everyone in it, would be bankrupted? This... Read Full Review

  • Dreaming in French : the Paris years of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davi

    by Kaplan, Alice Yaeger

    Reviewed by: Sheryn Morris, Librarian, Central Library

    July 30, 2012

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    Call Number: 920.073 K165

    Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy, Susan Sontag, and Angela Davis were three American women who, in their youth, spent time studying and living in Paris. Based on extensive research in archives in the United States and France, Alice Kaplan examines the lasting effects of the women's experiences which formed a lifelong French connection for all three. Living in France would sustain, nourish, and confirm a sense of independence and uniqueness in each of their lives. All three were outsiders within their social milieus in the United States.

    As a Catholic with divorced parents in the 1950s,... Read Full Review

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    Redshirts

    by Scalzi, John

    Reviewed by: Daryl M., Librarian, Central Library

    July 23, 2012

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    Call Number: SF

    What if your coworkers were regularly being killed off, and in spectacularly implausible ways, while your superiors were always left unfazed and untouched? Wouldn’t you try to figure out why and make sure whatever was happening to them didn’t happen to you? This is the premise John Scalzi boldly explores in Redshirts.

    Ensign Andrew Dahl has just been assigned to the Intrepid, the flagship of the Universal Union. But once he reports for his new posting, he can’t help but notice that things on the Intrepid are far from normal. His crewmates in the Xenobiology lab... Read Full Review

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    Watergate: a novel

    by Mallon, Thomas

    Reviewed by: Bob Timmermann, Senior Librarian, Science, Technology & Patents Dept.

    July 16, 2012

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    Call Number: F

    Although most of the events of the Watergate scandal are well-documented, there is still much that may never be known about what exactly happened. Who really ordered the break-in? What was on the missing 18 1/2 minutes of one White House tape? Who was the master organizer of the conspiracy?

    Sometimes the events of Watergate sound like they should be part of a good mystery novel, but Thomas Mallon takes a different approach here. Instead of looking at the grand conspiracy, Mallon weaves a story of fact and fiction that works incredibly well.

    While most of the major figures of... Read Full Review

  • The night circus : a novel

    by Morgenstern, Erin.

    Reviewed by: Daryl M., Librarian, Central Library

    July 9, 2012

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    “The circus arrives without warning.

    "No announcements precede it, no paper notices on downtown posts and billboards, no mentions or advertisements in local newspapers. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not.

    "The towering tents are striped in white and black, no golds and crimsons to be seen. No color at all, save for the neighboring trees and the grass of the surrounding fields. Black-and-white stripes on grey sky; countless tents of varying shapes and sizes, with an elaborate wrought-iron fence encasing them in a colorless world. Even what little... Read Full Review

  • The year of the gadfly : a novel

    by Miller, Jennifer, 1980-

    Reviewed by: Mary McCoy, Senior Librarian, Teen'Scape

    June 25, 2012

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    Call Number: M

    In the wake of a mysterious tragedy, 14-year-old aspiring journalist Iris Dupont is pulled out of school and enrolled at Mariana Academy, an elite private school with a strict honor code and a tightly wound, high achieving student body. Iris quickly realizes that Mariana isn’t as perfect as it seems. Rumors abound of students expelled and faculty dismissed under unusual circumstances, but no one will go on the record about it - they're all too worried that a scandal will damage the school’s reputation and crush their Ivy League dreams.

    With her imaginary friend/life... Read Full Review

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    Far north

    by Theroux, Marcel

    Reviewed by: Julie Huffman, Librarian, History & Genealogy Department

    June 4, 2012

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    Call Number: F

    If Cormac McCarthy’s brutal western Blood Meridian were set in the dystopian future of The Road and then translated into homespun sentences by Larry McMurtry, you’d approach Far North by Marcel Theroux.

    Narrated by Makepeace, the constable of a barren, post-apocalyptic town in Siberia, this is a story about survival in a struggling world. A “broken age,” as Makepeace tells it, one in which human beings who are deprived of food and “unwatched” are rat cunning and will not just kill you, but will “come up with a hundred and one reasons why you... Read Full Review

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    The chaperone

    by Moriarty, Laura

    Reviewed by: Robert Anderson, Librarian, Literature & Fiction Department

    May 28, 2012

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    Call Number: F

    Wichita, Kansas, 1922. Warren Harding is President, Prohibition is the law of the land, and many prominent citizens belong to the Ku Klux Klan. Cora Carlisle, at 36, is envied by her friends for her marriage to handsome, successful attorney Alan, her twin sons who are going off to college soon, and her large, comfortable home on a quiet suburban street. So why does Cora jump at the chance to chaperone the 15-year-old daughter of Myra Brooks, a casual acquaintance, to a New York dance class run by the famous Ruth St. Denis?

    Cora tells Myra and others that she wants to see some... Read Full Review

  • Hedy's folly : the life and breakthrough inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the most beautiful woman in the world

    by Rhodes, Richard

    Reviewed by: Sheryn Morris, Librarian, Central Library

    May 14, 2012

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    Call Number: 812.092 L216Rh

    Hedy Lamarr was a glamorous actress with a sultry demeanor which gave the impression of a self-igniting fire. She was also known for the line, “I am Tondelayo” from the 1942 version of the film White Cargo. The image of her speaking that line still makes some men more than a bit giddy. Not just another pretty actress, at one point she was called, “The most beautiful woman in the world.” Lamarr also had a brain and it was for the scientific and technical. During her Hollywood career it is possible to imagine people advising her not to worry her pretty head... Read Full Review

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