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  • These vicious masks

    by Shanker, Tarun.

    April 1, 2016

    Call Number: YA

    According to Merriam-Webster’s online dictionary, the term “superhero” dates back to at least 1917, and there are many characters from folklore, like Robin Hood, The Scarlet Pimpernel or Dr. Syn, The Scarecrow of Romney Marsh that predate the term. Like Batman, these heroes have no extraordinary powers. Instead, they rely upon their skill, cunning, training, the wearing of distinctive clothing, generally a costume that includes a mask and a cape, and, of course, having a secret identity to protect themselves and their loved ones. The idea of a super-powered superhero came to the fore in the... Read Full Review

  • Consider the fork : a history of how we cook and eat

    by Wilson, Bee.

    Reviewed by: Andrea Borchert, Librarian, Science, Technology & Patents Department

    March 29, 2016

    Call Number: 643.309 W746

    In the library we have vegetarian cookbooks and barbecue cookbooks. We have French cookbooks and microwave cookbooks. We have cookbooks by famous chefs and famous musicians. Almost anything you’ve ever wanted to serve at a meal, we have cookbooks that will help you make those foods. But why do we cook the way we do? What influences the way you make a breakfast slice of toast or cup of coffee?

    Bee Wilson, author of Consider the Fork, has the answer. It isn’t simply ingredients or culture that shapes food choices. She tells us that the way we cook, the technology we... Read Full Review

  • This old man : all in pieces

    by Angell, Roger.

    Reviewed by: David B., Librarian, InfoNow

    March 21, 2016

    Call Number: 818 A583

    Roger Angell, America's senior man of letters, returns with a collection of pieces culled from The New Yorker.  Angell was a long time fiction editor and baseball columnist for the magazine. He writes gracefully about the ravages of old age, and the pleasant memories of the past which keep him going after losing his wife and daughter. Angell's mother, Katherine White, and stepfather, E.B. White, both wrote for The New Yorker. Katherine White was the magazine's first fiction editor. E.B. White was a  mentor for Angell when he was budding young writer... Read Full Review

  • In memory's kitchen : a legacy from the women of Terezin

    Reviewed by: Sheryn Morris, Librarian, Central Library

    March 12, 2016

    Call Number: 940.5472437 I355

    This book is of special interest for Women’s Heritage Month, and in reference to the exhibit at Central Library, State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda.The subject matter of this book does not directly or completely address Nazi propaganda, but does so partially and in an oblique way.The setting was Terezin, a concentration camp which also was a transit center, with one section created as "a paradise ghetto" for propaganda, and at the very end as a death factory... Read Full Review

  • Illuminae

    by Kaufman, Amie.

    February 22, 2016

    Call Number: YA

    When Kady Grant got up in the morning, she thought breaking up with her soon to be ex-boyfriend, Ezra Mason, would be the most eventful thing to happen. Living on Kerenza IV, an illegal mining colony on the edge of the universe and farthest from anything exciting means routine is the norm. And then the ships came thundering out of the sky, bombing the mine and destroying anything else they could target. As upset with Ezra as she is, Kady can’t leave him to die at their school. The two of them take her truck to get away. She wants to go to the hospital where her mom is a Doctor. Ezra wants to... Read Full Review

  • All the birds in the sky

    by Anders, Charlie.

    Reviewed by: Andrea Borchert, Librarian, Science, Technology & Patents Department

    February 14, 2016

    All the birds in the sky is a slightly dystopian, romantic, comedic bildungsroman wrapped in a rich, creamy sci-fi, fantasy wrapper. It has everything you need from urban fantasy and science fiction: artificial intelligence, talking cats, great dialogue, flying, nerd parties, magic schools, doomsday machines, time travel, assassins posing as guidance counselors, riddles, loneliness, and love. The story, told in a series of flashbacks and in the present, follows two lonely kids: Laurence, who builds his own time machine and wears it on his wrist (it’s less useful than you... Read Full Review

  • A gathering of shadows

    by Schwab, Victoria.

    February 1, 2016

    In A darker shade of magic Victoria Schwab presented Kell and Lila set within their worlds of four different Londons. The magic and adventure continue in this sequel.

    It has been four months since the Black Night, when the rulers of White London attempted to take over Red London, leaving chaos and casualties in the wake of the attack. While Kell saved the kingdom from this threat, he is also blamed for what happened. Once a trusted member of the royal family, he is now viewed with suspicion, doubt,... Read Full Review

  • Neurotribes : the legacy of autism and the future of neurodiversity

    by Silberman, Steve, author.

    Reviewed by: Andrea Borchert, Librarian, Science, Technology & Patents Department

    January 25, 2016

    Call Number: 370.157 S5825

    How do you classify a condition like autism? The condition affects so many different people in such different ways that, the saying goes, “If you’ve met one person with autism, you’ve met one person with autism”. How can a condition that may have affected as diverse a group as Alan Turing, Leonardo Da Vinci, Temple Grandin, and Emily Dickinson be treated? What, or who, is to blame? What is there to celebrate in a life with autism? Our understanding of autism has changed so much and NueroTribes: the legacy of autism and the future of neurodiversity covers every step of that change... Read Full Review

  • Voracious : a hungry reader cooks her way through great books

    by Nicoletti, Cara, author.

    Reviewed by: Sheryn Morris, Librarian, Central Library

    January 13, 2016

    Call Number: 641.5 N643

    A recurring dream, shared by generations of immigrant parents and grandparents, is that they their offspring get an education, a good job and not have to earn a living doing manual labor. According to Cara Nicoletti her grandfather,  “ . . . always said he wanted us to ‘sit at a desk and have clean hands.’ “  She and her female relatives all worked in the family butcher shop, and Cara attended New York University, earning a degree in English literature.  However, the very job her grandfather would not have wished her to have was the one she loved.  Coming from... Read Full Review

  • Winter.

    by Meyer, Marissa.

    December 29, 2015

    Call Number: YA

    In Cinder, Marissa Meyer took readers to an Earth set several hundred years in the future to tell a version of Cinderella, with overtones of Anastasia, where the titular character is not only a cyborg, but may also be a long dead princess. Skillfully blending fairy tales with science fiction Meyer retold the classic story with flair and contemporary sensibilities.  In the subsequent books in The Lunar Chronicles series, Meyer added other fairy tale characters: Red Riding Hood and her... Read Full Review

  • Maze : solve the world's most challenging puzzle

    by Manson, Christopher.

    Reviewed by: Andrea Borchert, Librarian, Science, Technology & Patents Department

    December 21, 2015

    Call Number: 793.4 M289

     

    In 1985 there was a competition to solve a puzzle--a puzzle in the shape of a book. Christopher Manson presented this strange puzzle in an eerie picture book that he wrote and illustrated. Taken all together, the book itself is the maze. You enter the maze by turning the first page. But once you do, will you be able to find the center? Will you find your way back out again? Each page of the book represents a room. Each room has multiple doors that lead to different pages, and you have to chose the right ones to walk through. As you make your way through the maze the... Read Full Review

  • The girl at midnight

    by Grey, Melissa.

    December 7, 2015

    Call Number: YA

    Deep beneath New York City's Grand Central Station, there is a whole other world unknown to humans. It is the world of the Avicen, a magical race of humanoids with feathers instead of hair and decidedly avian instincts and culture. The Avicen have been at war with the Drakharin, another magical race of humanoids with the instincts and attributes of dragons, for longer than either race can remember. The last major engagement between the two races took place over a hundred years ago, with regular skirmishes occurring in order to increase the number of casualties, and to decrease any sense of... Read Full Review

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