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Robert Anderson

  • Amherst

    by Nicholson, William, author.

    July 6, 2015

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    British author William Nicholson is well known as a screenwriter, playwright and novelist.  Recently, Nicholson has been writing a series of novels about an extended British family between World War II and the present.  Amherst brings back some of the characters from this series (though no knowledge of earlier episodes is necessary) and uses them to examine an improbable real-life literary romance:  the 12-year love affair between Emily Dickinson's brother Austin and Mabel Loomis Todd, the much younger woman who edited the first volumes of Emily's poems after her death... Read Full Review

  • In certain circles

    by Harrower, Elizabeth, 1928- author.

    March 31, 2015

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    The revelation of a "rediscovered" Harper Lee novel is worldwide news. A similar case involving another octogenarian author, from Australia, has generated  much less media buzz but is nevertheless a significant literary event.  During the 1960s, Elizabeth Harrower was considered one of the most talented younger Australian novelists. Her four novels were praised in Britain and in Australia, which included acclaim and friendship from two stellar Australian novelists, Christina Stead and Patrick White.  A couple of years ago, an Australian publisher decided to reissue the four... Read Full Review

  • His own man

    by Ribeiro, Edgard Telles.

    October 27, 2014

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    Brazil is currently in the news because of its presidential election, featuring three major candidates representing various points on the political spectrum.  But, as novelist Edgard Telles Ribeiro reminds us in this mesmerizing tale of unbridled ambition and of idealism and friendship betrayed, Brazilian politics looked very different half a century ago.  In 1964, a military coup deposed the left-leaning government and received immediate recognition and support from the United States.  At the height of the Cold War, the U.S. was nervous about other countries in the Americas... Read Full Review

  • Shirley : a novel

    by Merrell, Susan Scarf.

    August 4, 2014

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    Next year will mark the fiftieth anniversary of the death of novelist Shirley Jackson, and since she died at 48 (in her sleep, of heart failure),  December 2016 will be the centenary of her birth.  Best remembered for her short story "The Lottery" and her novels The Haunting of Hill House and... Read Full Review

  • The kept girl/ by Kim Cooper.

    by Cooper, Kim, 1967-

    July 7, 2014

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    Call Number: M

    During the first few decades of the twentieth century, Los Angeles had more than its share of medical and/or religious celebrities who offered their worshipful followers a cure for ailments both physical and mental.  In her first novel, Kim Cooper, who has made a career out of sharing her knowledge of the more bizarre episodes in local history on her Esotouric bus tours, focuses on one such Southern California cult of the 1920s:  the Great Eleven.

    Run by a mother-daughter team, the Great Eleven used "Mother May" Blackburn... Read Full Review

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    The chaperone

    by Moriarty, Laura

    May 28, 2012

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    Call Number: F

    Wichita, Kansas, 1922. Warren Harding is President, Prohibition is the law of the land, and many prominent citizens belong to the Ku Klux Klan. Cora Carlisle, at 36, is envied by her friends for her marriage to handsome, successful attorney Alan, her twin sons who are going off to college soon, and her large, comfortable home on a quiet suburban street. So why does Cora jump at the chance to chaperone the 15-year-old daughter of Myra Brooks, a casual acquaintance, to a New York dance class run by the famous Ruth St. Denis?Cora tells Myra and others that she wants to see some Broadway shows,... Read Full Review

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