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David B.

  • The world of yesterday

    by Zweig, Stefan, 1881-1942.

    August 11, 2014

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    Call Number: 832 Z79Z 2013

    Stefan Zweig (1881-1942) was the most popular writer in continental Europe in the 1920s and 1930s. A novelist, short story writer, poet, playwright and journalist, Zweig wrote his memoir shortly before he took his own life in Brazil, exiled from his Austrian homeland.  In recent years, Zweig's works are back in print in the United States with new translations, and his personality inspired Ralph Fiennes character in... Read Full Review

  • On heaven and earth : Pope Francis on faith, family, and the church in the twenty-first century

    by Francis, Pope, 1936-

    May 12, 2014

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    Call Number: 261 F818

    In 2010, Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio (now Pope Francis) had a series of religious dialogues with a fellow Argentinian, Abraham Skorka, a Conservative Rabbi and biophysicist. The two religious leaders discussed the principle that the role of faith plays in dealing with contemporary issues such as economic inequality, euthanasia, treatment of the elderly, political corruption, abortion and materialism. More controversially, they shared their opposition to gay marriage, their respect for some communists, their agreement that the Catholic Church had a mixed record during the... Read Full Review

  • Year zero : a history of 1945

    by Buruma, Ian, author.

    March 11, 2014

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    Call Number: 909.9 B974

    1945 was the year that radically changed the world, according to Dutch historian Ian Buruma. Atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, beginning the Atomic Age. General Douglas MacArthur took charge of the Supreme Command of Allied Powers. At the end of the Second World War, Europe was divided up by forces from the United States and the Soviet Union, precipitating the Cold War. The United Nations was formed to prevent another worldwide catastrophe. The Nuremberg Trials were held to bring Nazi mass murderers to justice for genocide--the first time men had been put on trial... Read Full Review

  • The mayor of MacDougal Street : a memoir

    by Van Ronk, Dave.

    December 31, 2013

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    Call Number: 789.14 V275

    The inspiration for the new Coen brothers film, Inside Llewyn Davis, Dave Van Ronk (1936-2002), was the unofficial leader of the Greenwich Village folk music scene in the late fifties and early sixties. Unlike most of the New York-based performers, Van Ronk was a New York native who grew up in Queens and Brooklyn. He developed a love for jazz and blues at a young age, and frequented the Washington Square Park folk singing sessions. Though he had seen very little of the country until he was in his twenties, Van Ronk became deeply enamored of music from the American heartland.Van Ronk... Read Full Review

  • David and Goliath : underdogs, misfits, and the art of battling giants

    by Gladwell, Malcolm, 1963-

    November 4, 2013

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    Call Number: 174 G543-1

    Gladwell, a columnist for The New Yorker, has produced another bestseller about success, focusing on the advantages of the disadvantaged.  It is counterintuitive to think that David can triumph over Goliath. The biblical story, in the first book of Samuel, is a classic case of asymmetrical warfare.  David would have no chance of defeating a giant in hand-to-hand combat. The slingshot is his only option to vanquish Goliath.Gladwell profiles representative figures who demonstrate how hardships can be turned into strengths.  David Boies, one of America's leading... Read Full Review

  • Strokes of genius : Federer, Nadal, and the greatest match ever played

    by Wertheim, L. Jon.

    September 14, 2013

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    Call Number: 796.1 W499

     Tennis players rarely catch the attention of the American public anymore, even as modern racquet technology and training techniques have made the sport more exciting.  The sport has been dominated by Europeans for the last decade, and its old country club following has largely gravitated to golf. Despite the Williams sisters' mastery of the women's game, it takes a truly epic match between the top players for tennis to be water cooler fodder. Sports Illustrated writer L. Jon Wertheim recounts such a match in this excellent book. For the first time since the Borg-... Read Full Review

  • Instant : the story of Polaroid

    by Bonanos, Christopher, 1969-

    August 12, 2013

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    Call Number: 338.78 P762Bo

    Instant photography is so much a part of our lives that it is difficult to imagaine a time when it was a novelty.  In the late 1940s the Polaroid Land Camera was commercially available and it printed a photograph in one minute.  Edwin Land, the founder of Polaroid, was the Steve Jobs of his day, according to author Christopher Bonanos. He dropped out of Harvard and developed polarized filters for automobiles, sunglasses and 3-D spectacles. His Cambridge-based technology firm invented the first instant camera by the end of World War II. Instant color film was invented by... Read Full Review

  • White bicycles : making music in the 1960s

    by Boyd, Joe, 1942-

    June 3, 2013

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    Call Number: 788.99092 B789

    Joe Boyd is an iconic American music producer and executive who has been involved in the recording industry for five decades. His interest in music production began when he watched the pre-Dick Clark Bandstand on television in Princeton, New Jersey. On his first production gig, Boyd brought the blues artist Lonnie Johnson to Princeton. He subsequently enrolled in Harvard, where he became part of the bohemian folk scene in Cambridge.In Cambridge, Boyd became acquainted with folksingers Joan Baez, Bob Dylan and Maria D'Amato. He developed a relationship with George Wein, the... Read Full Review

  • Gods like us : on movie stardom and modern fame

    by Burr, Ty.

    April 22, 2013

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    Call Number: 301.55 B968

    Burr expounds on the nature of stardom from the early silent era to the present day in this provocative and well-researched tome. Iconic movie stars, including Mary Pickford, Charlie Chaplin, Clark Gable, Bette Davis, Marlon Brando, Harrison Ford, Meryl Streep and Tom Cruise are profiled. Burr questions the meaning of stardom in the Internet age, when stardom is often accidentally obtained, the major film studios have limited power, and stars have more currency as "brands" than actors.  While Gods Like Us is not a comprehensive overview of Hollywood history, Burr... Read Full Review

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