african american history month | Los Angeles Public Library
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african american history month


Image from Black Panther movie
Eileen Ybarra, February 28, 2018

Afrofuturism is the reimagining of a future filled with arts, science and technology seen through a black lens.

Devil in a Blue Dress movie poster (1995)
Janice Batzdorff, February 26, 2018

They work in Watts, Chicago, Oakland and Harlem, go on vacation in Provincetown, MA, and return home to Otis, South Carolina (pop. 5,000). They include an Ivy League professor, an ex-CIA agent, a volatile ex-cop, a journalist, a domestic worker, an attorney, a Ph.D.

portion of the front page of the liberator magazine
Neale Stokes, February 23, 2018

The Liberator is an early 20th-century Los Angeles African American newspaper, whose owner and editor, Jefferson Lewis Edmonds, was born enslaved and spent twenty years in bondage before Emancipation.

Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Building
Kelly Wallace, February 22, 2018

In 1920s Los Angeles, insurance companies considered blacks to be either uninsurable or extremely high risk. As a result, blacks were routinely denied coverage or charged exorbitant premiums.

Christina Rice, February 18, 2018

Los Angeles has always been a city of rich cultural diversity, often serving as a beacon of prosperity for migrants and immigrants around the globe.

Portrait of W. E. B. Du Bois
Keith Chaffee, February 20, 2018

On February 23, 1868, W. E. B. Du Bois was born. Du Bois was a sociologist and historian, and an important leader of the early African-American civil rights movement.

Louise Redding McClain
Kurt Thum, February 05, 2018

Louise Redding McClain, a retired Los Angeles Public Library librarian, is the sister of the great singer/songwriter Otis Redding.

photograph of Elva Diane Green and book cover of her book
Catherine Sturgeon, February 01, 2018

February is African American Heritage Month at the Los Angeles Public Library.

Martin Luther King Jr. and Governor Edmund G. Brown during a Freedom Rally at the Los Angeles Sports Arena on June 18, 1961. Photo Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library Herald-Examiner Collection
Eileen Ybarra, January 12, 2018

In the early 1960s, Martin Luther King, Jr., (MLK) symbolized hope, fortitude and change in a country that was caught in discriminatory social attitudes towards African-Americans. He was a leader and spokesperson for the Civil Rights Movement.